Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
tonight, the simpson's mr. burns gives usña rich man' look at the fiscal cliff. >> think of the economy as a car and the rich man is the driver. if you don't give the driver, he'll drive you over a cliff. >> that's an aside show and this is "hardball," the place for politics. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> never too early for pollsters to start head to 2016. guess who's looking very strong? hillary clinton. aç new abc news/washington pos poll say they would back hillary clinton. it's helpful no one has run a campaign against clinton for the past four years and also helping her numbers is 68% approve of theon she's done as secretary of state for this cou
of our fragile economy hangs in the fiscal cliff balance, for that let's turn to our distinguished guests. peter goodman. he's the huffington post business editor on a former "new york times"man. we welcome back republican congresswoman nan hayworth and haddy heath, senior policy analyst with the independent women's forum. okay. so mcconnell laughed at the tim geithner proposal. and john boehner says we're at a stalemate. and president obama himself is kind of getting ugly about this enemy's list. we've seen this before from him. my proposal is, republicans have to come with a counter offer. right now. there's no point in blasting obama. just a counter offer. i want to read from today's newspaper. this is what mitch mcconnell said. "higher medicare premiums for the wealthy, an increase in the medicare eligibility age, and a slowing of costs of living increases for programs like social security. and then republicans would agree to include more tax revenue in the deal but not from higher tax rates." now, let's just look at this for a second. we'll go to you first, nan. he wants medicare eli
the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to continue to invest in our infrastructure, a strong
effects for business travel if the economy falls off the fiscal cliff? the gbta predicts the reduced deficits and lower interest rates will lead to growth in the economy and an increase in business travel spending. >>> welcome back. now to the weather channel. reynolds wolf is standing by. what is happening around the country today? >> the story is all west. everything is taking place out west. rain, some strong winds, even some snow. some places snow getting up to around 2, 3 feet, but that is high elevation. but for the eastern seaboard, pretty quiet p. temperatures very mild this time of year. when you get into the center of the u.s., still fairly mild conditions. a bit cooler as you might imagine in spots up like towards the twin cities and even over towards chicago. but then out west, that's where the trouble really brews. it's that time of year that there's norm lay big area of high pressure that sets up off the west coast. that's gone and that allows all the pacific moisture to come through. high snow will be an issue. rain in seattle. so how is it going to affect your travel?
sales, the economy and of course the fiscal cliff. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. >>> welcome back to "squawk
the fiscal cliff could cause major problems for state economies. which face the biggest threat from the potential tax hikes? joining us on the phone is laura porter, managing director at the public finance department, sector head for the state ratings group which focuses on state credits across the country. and focuses on a report, laura, looking granularly at this. good morning. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in general, you argue that a lot of ratings on the state front will remain unchanged no matter what. why is that? >> we feel states are fundamentally very strong credits, have strong control over their revenues and spending and the vast majority have shown the ability and willingness to adjust. so we think that the biggest and immediate threat is the fiscal cliff and what that can mean for state revenues, which quickly react to changing economy. >> you make the point -- surprise to no one, you have an unusually high degree of uncertainty in this outlook and that's because -- walk us through a scenario. we go over the cliff, and we begin seeing materially lower reven
that, a lot of dough being thrown around. >> brian: how much do you know about the fiscal cliff? >> it reminds me about something i probably learned in school. but some type of cliff, the economy going pow. >> isn't that the government? this is embarrassing. >> brian: how many people really know what it is and what it means? we hit the streets. >> steve: indeed, and bob costas and his no spin zone to defend his half time gun control rant. what did he say and what does former nfl player think? he will join us live to react this hour. "fox & friends" hour two for thursday starts right now. >> gretchen: i thought the same thing that scarlet johansson was in times square answering ainsley's question. i thought what, a lucky day for steve and brian that yesterday they would have petra and today scarlet. >> brian: and the day before, victoria secret models. >> gretchen: what a week! >> steve: one of the young people when did respond said fiscal cliff, that sounds like something i probably studied in school. no. this is new. this is something that they've just fresh baked up for us. >>
in gold. i don't know why it would end. i didn't find -- look. maybe you think that we go to fiscal cliff and it's so deflationary that no one wants to own gold. you could argue that this is a return to the great recession. i don't know. in terms of slowdown in the economy and why inflation is dead. inflation would be dealt a mortal blow if there was inflation by going over the fiscal cliff. austerity does not breed inflation. >> do you believe that sandy is a convenient excuse here for these adp numbers? >> i think sandy was terrible. goldman upgrades waste management today. anyone who has ever been to the giant dumps that waste management has, it's where you dump -- dumping is an expensive thing. when you're a contractor and you have to clean up sandy of which there's immense damage, waste management gets a cut of everything. i think sandy is gigantic. the ripples continue to come. i think new york is going to be hurt very badly by sandy. >> let's move onto starbucks. starbucks today brewing more than coffee. world's largest coffee company announcing during investor day today it plans t
fiscal cliff issue that one of the main areas of the economy of really the country that is going to be impacted after january first is donations to charities. i know you have some thoughts about that, about that concern and how we may have to get the message out that this is such an important focus. tell us about that. >> it is a really difficult question. certainly all of us are looking, you know, potentially as a really big thing. i think what are we going to be left with? we have to look at the bigger picture and say if we are investing in some charities we are investing in our community and we are investing in ourselves. i don't want to see that go away. this is making your world a better place for all of us. >> this great group, these are people that volunteer their time, their efforts and really their hearts. it is so uplifting. i know you probably agree. we talk so much about the negative things. what a great story and great positive event. >> it is an honor to have him here on the floor and for the event tonight. thanks so much. still to come the ceo on holiday season sal
? >> it was not. i like the management of dolmen. >> how is cantor positioned for the fiscal cliff? are you just strapped in and ready to go over the other side. >> i think taxes will go up, twll be a lot of conjecture overs next 30 days or so, and then tell get a reality to that we have a problem, we have to tighten our boot strap, figure out how to actually inject money into the economy and how to cut some of the costs out of our government. >> you want to inject money into the economy and cut costs at the same time. how do you do that? >> certainly you look at the perspective you'll raise taxes on the higher end, but you're also going to have to cut some of the fat in the government. and that takes time. we need corporations to actually drive us out of this problem. the government isn't the solution here. >> the government is not the solution. >> correct. >> well, they are part of the problem. before a private sector solution, it seems like we have to get over this problem in the near term. it's a huge amount of money just being sucked right out of the economy on january 1st. >> i don't disag
to the fiscal cliff. they gave themselves a ton of time to work this out. what would happen to the economy if a deal similar to the president's plan were to go into effect? fox business network stuart varney joins me right now. you listen to nancy pelosi. they made all kinds of painful concessions in order to just even put this first plan out there. melissa: look you put in place a plan like the president has proposed and it is a recipe for real economic trouble, maybe even a recession. martha, just for a second, take the politics out of this. consider where we're starting from. we have 8% unemployment, very slow growth and we have 3.5 billion added every day to our national debt. if you impose this massive tax increase and take away any restraint on the government borrowing of new money you're looking at potential higher unemployment, that the real danger you have runaway borrowing and set up what is called a debt crisis at some point in the future. this plan or anything like it, if it is imposed january the 1st is very bad news for the economy. martha: you know, democrats say republicans
and that there really i don't believe is any effect from the supposed anxiety about the fiscal cliff. i think people know there will be some type of resolution. we didn't know the details or when. but companies are still investing the way they would normally do and they're not stopping because of -- >> that doesn't make us quake a bit about the jobs report later this will week and what that does for investors' nerves? >> we know it will be worse than it would have been because of super storm sandy. so you didn't know how much it was to do with that and how much was the economy. so it will be a bit of a wash in terms of reading the tea leaves for the u.s. >> so the growth picture for the u.s., we sort of 1%, 2%, depending on what happens with the fiscal cliff. what do you think, 2.5%? >> yeah, i think we should be 2.5% to 3% by the end of next year. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in ital
, as the fiscal cliff debate developments, there is limited up side for interest rates and it's hard to see stocks moving much higher. >> so let's suppose we get an agreement. that should increase confidence. does that mean the economy performs better next year than we expect and then what's the feed through from that? >> yeah, i think while we're now focused on a lot of the down side risks not only from the fiscal cliff but obviously also from the eurozone crisis, we may have overlooked some of these up side potential for next year. so if we get a favorable resolution for the fiscal cliff, i think we can see interest rates move up quite sharply. that would be because expectations for growth could be much higher, so if growth is around the 2% in the first half of the year, we could be haufing over the 3% range in the second half of the rear. that would mean higher interest rates and that could be a very poor result for top quality bonds. >> and when you're talk about interest rates, you're talking about market rates as opposed to fed rates, right? >> the treasury rate, baseline underwhich say corp
of industry more than just helping the financial sector. >>> extraordinary. as the fiscal cliff fight rages on in washington, we will take a look at the ripple effect being felt on wall street. a preview of the trading day when we come back. >>> it's been a pretty strong session in europe stocks this morning. for the most part led by thee xetra dax up by 0.3%. u.s. futures, dow about 33 points at the open. so perhaps we could finish the month in the green. let's see what ben liechtenstein thinks. so what's your sense of how this day is shaping up? will we finish on an up note? >> we're seeing slightly positive territory, but very little conviction associated with the trade. again off the weak low that we saw i think it was wednesday, 1383 roughly. the last couple days it's been of a chop type trade. we're headed into the session similar situation, unable to get up before yesterday's high in the overnight session. i'm looking at the dollar really right now. it's kind of in chop trade, as well. even with all the developments and news coming out of europe, we're seeing a very choppy type curre
29 days to go before the u.s. hits the fiscal cliff. both sides are blaming each other for the standoff unsurprisingly. timothy geithner is pushing the gop to offer specific ideas and predicts they'll eventually yield on raising tax rates on the wealthy, but john boehner is standing firm against those high taxes. >> we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. >> why does it make sense for the country to force tax increases on all americans because a small group of governors want to extend tax rates for 2% of americans. no reason why that should happen. >> geithner says republicans will be responsible if no budget deal is reached by the end of the month. boehner says the fight has only begun and he's interested in cutting a deal and not sounding a fiscal alarm. we'll be talking about how the two sides might be able to break the deadlock with a did democratic strategist in the next half hour or so. now, singapore airlines has confirmed it's in talks with
to avoid the fiscal cliff, carl. >> times a-wastin. with the deadline inching closer what needs to be done to reach an agreement? judd gregg is a former republican senator, governor of new hampshire and co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt as well as a cnbc contributor. i'm glad to say he's at post nine. good to have you back. >> great to be here, carl. >> is the conventional wisdom that the president has won this round correct and is that good if your goal is to get to a deal in the end? >> i think the president clearly has the microphone and he has the election behind him as the winner so he obviously has more cards i believe than the republicans have, but i think speaker boehner has acted very responsibly here, come forward with a very aggressive proposal. he said he's willing to raise revenues so he's moved that needle very considerably. and to me all that needs to be done to get this deal done is for the two of them to get in a room and ask the staff to go to lunch and they work it out, because the parameters of an agreement are pretty clear. >> the speaker has not brought up rate
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)